Covid – Family

There’s no question, many people depend upon YOU everyday.  Before you can help others during a crisis like Covid-19, you need to take care of yourself and your loved ones. Here are a few pointers for keeping yourself and your family healthy during this crisis.

Taking care of yourself

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands. (Source: US Center For Disease Control and Prevention(CDC))

Keeping your family healthy

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
  • If you are sick: You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then you should do your best to cover your coughs and sneezes, and people who are caring for you should wear a facemask if they enter your room. Learn what to do if you are sick.
  • If you are NOT sick: You do not need to wear a facemask unless you are caring for someone who is sick (and they are not able to wear a facemask). Facemasks may be in short supply and they should be saved for caregivers.
  • If you are sick: You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then you should do your best to cover your coughs and sneezes, and people who are caring for you should wear a facemask if they enter your room. Learn what to do if you are sick.
  • If you are NOT sick: You do not need to wear a facemask unless you are caring for someone who is sick (and they are not able to wear a facemask). Facemasks may be in short supply and they should be saved for caregivers. (Source: US Center for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC))

Avoid public gatherings

Reducing the infection rate of COVID-19, referred to as “flattening the curve,” will be achieved by exercising “social distancing” — reducing the number of large gatherings and by maintaining at least six feet of distance between individuals.

​Recently, Gov. Janet Mills has prohibited public gatherings of more than 10 people. Also, Gov. Mills has ordered restaurants and bars to close their dine-in facilities. (Source: Gov. Janet Mills, 3/18/2020).  With these parameters in mind, use common sense when you are out and about.​

 

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?  (from CDC)

 

What the CDC instructs if you are sick

 

Talking With Children: Tips for Caregivers, Parents, and Teachers During Infectious Disease Outbreaks

This fact sheet provides parents, caregivers, and teachers with strategies for helping children manage their stress during an infectious disease outbreak. It describes potential reactions among youth and the support adults can provide to help them.
​Click to download (PDF)

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